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Nitrate Test Kits

Visual Kits

Range MDL Method Type Kit Refill No.
0 - 3.4 ppm as N 0.3 ppm Zinc Reduction CHEMets K-6905 R-7002
0 - 4.5 ppm as N 0.4 ppm Cadmium Reduction CHEMets K-6904 R-7002
0 - 45 ppm as N 4 ppm Cadmium Reduction CHEMets K-6909D R-7002 + A-6900
0 - 225 ppm as N 20 ppm Cadmium Reduction CHEMets K-6909A R-7002 + A-6900

Instrumental Kits

Range Method Type Kit
0 - 1.50 ppm as N Zinc Reduction Vacu-vials K-6913
0 - 1.50 ppm as N Cadmium Reduction Vacu-vials K-6903
0 - 7.50 ppm as N Cadmium Reduction Vacu-vials K-6923
0 - 50.0 ppm as NO₃ Cadmium Reduction Vacu-vials K-6933

The CHEMetrics test kits for the determination of Nitrate in aqueous solutions are based on patented Self-Filling Reagent Ampoule technology, and employ zinc reduction and cadmium reduction methods, delivering sensitivity and accuracy within two minutes or less. The Zinc reduction method is cadmium-free and simplifies disposal procedures. Premixed. Premeasured. Precise. Each kit contains 30 tests. Suitable for potable, surface and seawater as well as industrial wastewater testing.

The Zinc Reduction Method (Cadmium Free)

Nitrate is reduced to nitrite using Zinc as the reducing agent. The resulting nitrite concentration is then determined colourimetrically. Nitrate concentrations can also be determined in the presence of low levels of nitrite (by difference). Results are expressed as ppm (mg/l) N (NO3-N).

The benefit of the Zinc Reduction chemistry is that it is resistant to chloride interference, and is suitable for testing seawater and brines; and also does not contain the heavy metal Cadmium, simplifying disposal procedures. This test method is applicable to industrial wastewaters, drinking water, surface waters and seawater. The test kit is based on the patented CHEMetrics Self-Filling Reagent Ampoule technology.

This new visual colourimetric test kit's test method is applicable to industrial wastewaters, drinking, and surface waters, and seawater.

References:
ASTM D 3867-09, Nitrate-Nitrite in Water, Test Method B.
APHA Standard Methods, 22nd ed., Method 4500-NO3- E -2000.
USEPA Methods for Chemical Analysis of Water and Wastes, Method 353.3 (1983).
Nelson, J.L., Kurtz, L.T., and R.H. Bray, Rapid Determination of Nitrates and Nitrites. Anal. Chem., V26, p. 1081-1082, (1954).

The Cadmium Reduction Method

Nitrate is reduced to nitrite using cadmium as the reducing agent. The resulting nitrite concentration is then determined colourimetrically. This method is applicable to drinking and surface waters, as well as domestic and industrial wastes. Nitrite will interfere with this test. Results are expressed as ppm (mg/l) NO3-N or NO3.

References:
ASTM D 3867-09, Nitrate-Nitrite in Water, Test Method B.
APHA Standard Methods, 22nd ed., Method 4500-NO3- E -2000.
USEPA Methods for Chemical Analysis of Water and Wastes, Method 353.3 (1983).

Technical Data Sheet

Applications

Nitrate is the most completely oxidised form of nitrogen, formed during the final stages of biological decomposition in the nitrogen cycle, where nitrifying bacteria convert nitrites to nitrates, either in wastewater treatment facilities or in natural water supplies. Nitrate is bioavailable, and aquatic plants use nitrates as a food source. Low-level nitrate concentration may be present in natural waters usually less than 2.2 ppm (mg/l).

Most groundwater and drinking water nitrate content in the UK derives from diffuse pollution from inorganic fertilisers from farmland runoff, the remainder being from sewage sludge disposal to land, atmospheric pollution and point sources. Nitrate levels have increased post-WW2 because of intensified agricultural activities including ploughing of grassland and increase fertiliser usage. Groundwater nitrate concentrations steadily increased between 1985 and 20021.

Excessive nitrate levels in natural waters, such as over 40 ppm (mg/l), may be toxic to aquatic insects or fish2 and can cause algal blooms. Elevated levels in drinking water may be carcinogenic. The Directive Prescribed Concentration or Value (PCV) for free Nitrate in drinking water in the UK and Ireland is 50 mg/l (ppm) (11.3 ppm as N).

References

  1. British Geological Survey. Nitrate contamination in groundwater. Retrieved 23 July 2022 from
    https://www2.bgs.ac.uk/groundwater/quality/nitrate/home.html
  2. Water Rangers. Nitrates. Retrieved 23 July 2022 from
    https://waterrangers.ca/testkits/tests/nitrates/